History’s Shadows and Light Reusable Universes: Shih Chieh Huang Power, Haunting and Resilience on View Aug 19 to Dec 17
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Taipei Cultural Center in New York , in collaboration with Flushing Town Hall and Taiwanese Student Organization, Graduate Center, CUNY, present Enchanted Formosa. The concert explores the rich history of Taiwan in a multi-genre musical performance. Enchanted Formosa captures over one hundred years of Taiwan’s history, from the Qing imperial era, to the Japanese colonial decades, to present day Taiwan. Combining traits of folk, pop, and alt-rock music, Hsieh Yu-Wei Band and guest artists will share the provocative and traditional ideas of the time with music that highlights the indigenous tribes, the Hoklo groups, and the Hakka villages. 【This program is part of the 30th Anniversary of the Lifting of Martial Law in Taiwan】 Skylight Room, Graduate Center, CUNY (365 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10016) Sep. 6 | Wed. | 7-9pm / R.S.V.P. is required CLICK HERE Flushing Town Hall (137-35 Northern Blvd., Flushing, NY 11354) Sep. 8 | Fri. | 7:30-9:30pm / R.S.V.P. is required CLICK HERE

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The lifting of Martial Law (1987) was a turning point for Taiwan’s progression toward democratization and openness. This year, on the 30th anniversary of the lifting of martial law, the Taipei Cultural Center of TECO in New York has organized special events including contemporary art exhibition to memorialize this particular time in history. Power, Haunting and Resilience is organized by Taipei Fine Arts Museum, the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University and Taipei Cultural Center in NY. This show features the most representative artworks between the martial law period and 2014, which is on view through December 17 at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum. During the period under martial law, politics and the operation of society in Taiwan were oppressed and restrained. From the imposition of martial law to the end of it, democracy’s influence has not only affected sociopolitical life but also arts and culture. Due to the transformation of the government system, artists were liberated from oppression and confinement, and allowed to become open and innovative. This freedom has helped nurture artistic potential. For the past few decades, contemporary art in Taiwan has sprung up like mushrooms, existing freely in all possible forms. Many artists have even been …

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The full impact of Martial Law was not immediately felt in Taiwan after its lifting in 1987. To some Taiwanese, especially those whose loved ones and family members had been jailed, killed, or simply disappeared, the 40-plus years of living under Martial Law was like a nightmare. Their only hope was daybreak, when they could finally wake up and leave the nightmare behind. However, the repression and abuse people suffered under Martial Law lingers on those who survived, and only after a number of years can they vent their emotions and express the anguish and the suffering they endured during the era through cinema.  This category of films includes ones directly confronting the taboo issue of the February 28th Incident, such as City of Sadness, but there are even more films about those who were deeply wounded in body and soul. Some of the survivors can still feel the pain today. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the lifting of Martial Law and Taiwan’s march toward democracy. Now is the right time to reveal “those who were left” and “those who come later” in films. Films chosen for this program cover the past three decades of Taiwan cinema and …

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This year marks the 30th anniversary of the lifting of martial law in Taiwan. The imposition of martial law stretched beyond sociopolitical issues and into arts and culture, which at that time, were unfairly interpreted through ideological lens. Under this strict censorship, many artworks were labelled unlawful, and ended up being either forcefully revised or banned.  However, after the lifting of martial law, in addition to the liberation of the media, and the lifting of the ban on forming political parties, the public was allowed to assemble and express their opinions. Artistic creations were also liberated from oppression and confinement, and become open and innovative. For the past few decades, contemporary art in Taiwan has sprung up like mushrooms, existing freely in all possible forms. Such phenomenon undoubtedly goes hand in hand with the development of democracy in Taiwan. Thus, we have curated this special event for the 30th anniversary of the lifting of martial law, which includes an exhibition of documentary images, a contemporary art exhibition, pop music performances, as well as a film series. All of these activities will take place in New York City, along with other cities in the United States. All activities include seminars, through …

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History’s Shadows and Light Dates: Aug. 29 – Oct. 12, 2017 Venue: TECO-NY Gallery (1 E. 42nd St., 1st and 2nd floors) Curators: Sharleen YU, LIU Chen-hsiang Artists/Group: LIU Chen-hsiang│HSU Po-hsin│HUANG Tzu-ming│The Green Team Opening: Aug. 29, 6:30-8:00pm. Admission is free, but RSVP is required. Press Preview: Aug. 28, 2:00-6:00pm Curators’ Walkthrough: Aug. 29, 5:30pm (in collaboration with Asia Art Archive in America) Guided Tours: Sep. 21 & Oct. 5, 5:00pm (in English)│Sep. 28, 4:00pm (in Mandarin Chinese)  Please register in advance  via email at ellenko@tpecc.org or phone call on 212-317-7357. Organized by and first shown as a special section of the exhibition Faint Light, Dark Shadows at Taipei Fine Arts Museum from March to June of this year, History’s Shadows and Light features photographs of major political and social movements in Taiwan from 1986 to 1990—a time when photography not only served witness to society’s drastic transformation immediately before and after the end of martial law in 1987, but also began to expand the expressive force and contagious appeal of the contemporary photographic aesthetic. This exhibition ponders some of the issues that arose with the lifting of martial law, such as human rights, farmers’ and workers’ movements, and environmental protection, as documented through the …

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Sponsored by the Taiwan Ministry of Culture, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Tourism Bureau and Taipei Cultural Center, organized by the curator Mia Min Yen, the live concert, “Taiwanese Waves,” returns to SummerStage, ready to wow New Yorkers once again. It takes place on Saturday, July 29th. Taiwan’s rich sounds and diverse culture will once again fill the air in Central Park. The event is free, and we welcome all to attend. SummerStage, a program of the CityParks Foundation, is known for presenting outstanding performances, free of charge in a world famous venue – Manhattan’s Central Park. A year ago, Taiwanese Waves brought the unique sounds of Taiwan to SummerStage for the first time, which drew the biggest crowd than any other single night in SummerStage’s 30 year history. This year, the lineup includes the winner of Taiwan’s 28th Golden Melody Awards in Album of the Year, Sangpuy; the soft but powerful indie musicians Berry J and Dadado Huang; and the band behind the 2014 runaway hit “Island’s Sunrise,” FireEX. Together they will showcase their distinct musical styles in Central Park. Speaking about the unique facets that “Taiwanese Waves” will provide, show curator Mia Min Yen said “Both New York and …

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Taipei Cultural Center in New York is thrilled to announce that the 40th Asian American International Film Festival will present TAIWAN CINEMA DAYS by showcasing 3 compelling Taiwanese films of the year including SMALL TALK by Hui-chen Huang, THE RECEIPTIONIST by Jenny Lu, and A FOLEY ARTIST by Wan-jo Wang with the filmmakers in person. SMALL TALK, an autobiographical documentary executive produced by the film amateur Hou Hsiao-Hsien, is selected as the centerpiece presentation of this year’s AAIFF and will have its NY premiere screening on July 29th at Asia Society after having received 2017 Berlinale Teddy Award for the best documentary this February. TAIWAN CINEMA DAYS also highlights two works of Taiwan’s rising talents: A FOLEY ARTIST and THE RECEPTIONIST. Directed by Wan-jo Wang, A FOLEY ARTIST is the first documentary about the history of sound-production in Taiwanese films by telling the story of professional Foley artist Hu Ding-Yi, who recreates sound in wildly creative ways and gives life and energy to a film. Inspired by true events, Jenny Lu’s debut feature THE RECEPTIONIST depicts the secret lives of the employees and clients of an illegal massage parlor in London through the eyes of a foreign graduate who lands …

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